Don’t Know a Product Guarantee or Support?

That sounds like a great contest to me. If I can’t find a product guarantee in an ad, I’m ‘supposed’ to have one, which I assume has services that are worth less than the guarantee or a procedure that you’re not aware of that claims to have some kind of ironclad relationship with the product or you’ll be out the door.

Extending long with the debate of how to create a guarantee, I’d like to address a more trivial point. I’m not an experienced sales person, and was considering this as a hurdle I could remove, yet it seemed just a little strange to me. What if you were selling a book with a guarantee, and your readers wanted more? I suppose I could offer it if they’d pay more for a edition of a book, but what about the 95-cent ebook publication? How would you handle it, is my thought answer? Or do they just go buy a right or do they opt into a special code for a set of that book, or pay what’s required for up to an 8-button course? Who will actually pay for it?

So, here are some interesting points. First, have you applied what you would normally offer with your sale, and then extended the offer to a small section of your audience? If I have a book in my store, but I’m prequalified on my website as someone in a certain type of line of work, have I told people “Hey, I think you could really be interested in this book. I have one this week, an excerpt, is this your type of material?”

The first line of reply is always, “No, I don’t have it in stock, I have to go get it, or else,” and the second response, “One these folks doesn’t hurt their wallet.” Or, I might tack on discount at the end of the sale, because everyone likes discount. If I wanted to use this as a great conversation piece for this week’s interaction, make sure I’ve told the reason why I am doing it. If there’s an interesting interaction, I’ll mention it, every time.

What we’re describing here is a way to leverage your offer. You’re getting a lot more than a guarantee, and in the process you might have justified additional pricing, and have given them an incentive to come over to your jayapoker website. Not big deals, right. But, you have subtly helped them justify paying you better from a game they didn’t know they were missing if they didn’t take that action. It’s just the way it works.

If you don’t have a guarantee, change it. Although you may actually have good stuff, this is still a good way of showing your competence, through the use of the word “guarantee.” We should all know that, if we are prequalified to buy something, they should be prepared to pay more than the stated price, or what’s best, the true value of the product. So, make a great offer, not a taut guarantee, and stick with it.

Keep in mind that when you are addressing an ad or your form completely, without any skin-deep internal discussion, you’ve lost the chance to interest them in a real person. And, if you don’t already, you’ve lost the ability to throw something positive and relevant at them that, even though you don’t guarantee it, adds value to their lives.

But, if you do have a solid offer, and someone is willing to take you up on it, great; but the question you must ask is whether or not you should make your offer a guarantee. After all, what if you trust me, this is good stuff, but you can’t have them buy it in order to access the good stuff? What I would suggest is that you offer the option to make an action. This is the way you don’t have to burden them with the book, and you aren’t giving up your guarantee. You just make it whatever you can.

A scary nut, I know. But what if youclient, and then were unable to move? A little fear of getting ripped off is there?